Poetry: Bound

Baby given up with no name;

Until someone took her in- shelter from the storm;

Once nameless, now framed with a name;

Adopted by a family, last name changed;

Growing up, a feeling she never could ignore;

Secrets kept, she never once implore;

Memories lost she couldn’t restore;

Bound lost, lonely, abandoned, hopeless, dazed, and confused;

A house that felt like no home;

A family disconnected;

Betrayed of lies;

But one remained hidden deep inside;

Within her heart, a longing she couldn’t sway;

A face once without a name, named.

Had a home.

Had a family.

Had a life beyond some.

Yet, deep within,

A child once nameless,

Could never separate her from reality;

Deep within, her heart bound by

Lost, lonely, abandoned, hopeless, dazed, and confused.

Prompt: Graceful

Last few weeks, watching the kids play, I been noticing certain girls wanting to teach dance to their friends. They come and tell me how no one wants to play with them. To which I ask, “Did you even ask them to play?” Their response, “No.” Then, I tell them how I can’t help them when they didn’t try. I tell them they need to ask because no one can read their minds. Sometimes they run away asking, other times they stand there looking confused. Kids.

One day I asked them what are they planning on playing because when I suggest some kids to ask to play with, they say no, they don’t want to ask them. They look embarrassed or weirded out in asking those kids (mainly the boys). The girls tell me excitedly they are dancing. And they need two more two teach it.

I’ve seen two of the girls when they teach dancing, they are very picky about how their classmates are standing. If their classmate moves from that position, the girls would immediately go back to them and move them to the correct position.

It’s not just the younger age group of girls dancing, it’s also a few of the older girls; however, the older kids don’t get as picky on positions and move their friends to the position they are telling.

I watch how the kids turn so gracefully and sway to a tune in their heads. The older kids hum the tune sometimes. The younger kids, most of them don’t. If you ask them to sing a song, some of the kids in the younger age go quiet. A lot of them don’t like the spotlight and yet, they’ll dance right there in front of everyone.

It’s fun watching the kids have fun. They do work all morning in the classroom and their routine is about the same everyday- it can get rather boring. Play time they can run around outside, climb on the jungle gym or the monkey bars for the older kids. They can express themselves.

Graceful

Prompt: Cheat

Cheat

I have been working with daycare kids since 2012 and switched to a private school since last February. Since then, I have realized, not only high school students try to copy and cheat off one another on homework, papers, test, etc. Even 3.5-5.5 year olds try to copy off of each other’s papers!

There are two little girls- they are cousins. They have the same level of paperwork. After passing out the papers, the children sit and do their work. The teacher made it clear for them to do it on their own. She’s the lead teacher, so I say, “Ok”. As long as they try we can help them.

No matter how many times the other teacher tells them they have to be separated or tell them to separate they find their way together again. They sit together and one peaks onto the other’s paper or even ask, “Is this one right?” I think it’s cute they learning off of each other because they are cousins. One does know some of it a bit more than the other. Still, it’s not good to start a habit in copying.

I find it interesting that whenever the other teachers been around these girls always go and sit together. But when teacher goes off on vacation and it’s just me or me and a helper, they only did it once or twice to me in two weeks.

Looking at the word “Cheat”, I was thinking about these two girls. How they haven’t sat together last whole week and the week before. Week before they only did it once or twice that was it.

They aren’t the only ones. Another two girls used to sit together everyday, too. They started to separate and do their own work, rather than sit and talk and exchange answers.

I hope they keep at it because I don’t want them going to another school and get caught copying off of someone else’s work. I always tell these kids to try to do it by yourself. I won’t be following you into your other schools to help you. They just shake their heads- some understand, some I question whether they do.

Kids with Allergies

Those kids with allergies, sitting there unable to eat the cookies or cakes their classmates bring, I feel so bad for them.

One kid we had, she was allergic to MSG and another (GMO?) that I’m not aware of. She was also allergic to a few other foods. We had to check with the front desk if she could eat outside food. Whenever she didn’t get a cake or cookie, she’d cry. I felt bad. She’s only four. Yet, age is no competition to allergies. Allergens don’t care if you’re a baby or above 100 years old.

Another kid we have, from her many list of food allergies, one among them is eggs. She said boiled eggs she can eat. “That’s it.” She nodded her head as she ended with that while answering my question of allergy to egg.

This girl, wanted a cookie so bad. Her classmate brought cookies that day because it was his last day. I think deep down she knew she couldn’t have it but still said yes to the teacher asking her. I questioned the teacher about the eggs. She said, “No, it doesn’t have any.” I looked at the ingredients while she asked the assistant director whether the girl can have one. She asked does she want it? The teacher said yes. The assistant director decided let her have it.

When I told the teacher about egg in it the assistant director already left. The teacher’s response, “She told me to give her because she [the girl] wants it.”

I didn’t want that girl to have an allergy attack and the way she answered the teacher, she wasn’t confident in saying she could have it. I’ve seen her where she can have something and I question her for the allergy. It wasn’t like that answer. It was more of a I want it but I don’t want to say it. Kind of like she’s hiding something.

When she got the cookie though, she didn’t eat it. At least when asking her did she take a piece of it, she said no. She just sat with it. I asked her in a nice way, “You asked for the cookie so you can throw it away?” I didn’t want to make her feel bad. I do that with my nickel allergy when I want a chocolate or something. I sit with it until I finally throw it away or put it away. She couldn’t take it home with her because she was in school. She’s only 4.5 years old. So why make her feel bad about it?

I told her after she told me again about the boiled eggs are the only ones she can have, when baking cookies, the eggs are usually not boiled. That is why I thought she couldn’t have it. She understood. And she threw the cookie away.

My guess is she was thinking she could save it for her little brother. But usually the other teacher says to the kids to throw it away, so I don’t think they save it. Plus, she doesn’t have any lunchbox to hide it in. So, if she forgets to take it ants will go crazy-they already are in the classroom-climbing the walls like mad. One kid’s snack was left open in her cubby. She took it out and found ants already in it.

And that’s why I tell them, close your bags nicely. And that’s why all snacks should be left in the cafeteria.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

At first, I wasn’t going to buy this. Then, sitting and reading it at Barnes and Noble’s Starbucks made me want it. But hey, it’s $29 for the hardcopy. I heard it was about $18 at Target. Therefore, after reading 20 pages, I left.

I went straight to Target hoping they had some left. They had tons. The book itself is sold for $17.99; however, in stores it is on sale $19 with a “free” poster as the cashier told me. The poster alone is $1.49 and is sold only at Target.

Looking at the receipt, you would think the book would be priced $17.99 and a free poster. I thought that made sense to me, since the book by itself is that price. This is all judging from what I read on the receipt. Either way, purchasing from Target saved money considering the same exact book can be bought for $26 at Barnes and Noble and the inside cover of the book selling price is $29.99. It’s a good deal.

I read today about 40 pages. Last month since I went to PA, I had not been in the mood to finish a book. Therefore, my read one book a month resolution failed for July. I hope to go back to the book I was reading that time. Currently, I think I will be focusing on this one- the 8th book of Harry Potter.

This is a special rehearsal edition script and I read somewhere at Barnes and Noble this book is only sold for sometime in stores.

The front cover looks like a bird’s nest with wings and a child looking scared inside it. The title of the novel is: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child Parts One and Two. This is based on an original new story by JK Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne. This book was released last month. It is about 300 some pages long.

The back of the book:

I am thinking there are many series (tv, movies, books, etc) we had to say farewell to, but Harry Potter will not be one of them. At least, not for awhile.

Prompt: Narrow- I Don’t Understand…

I really don’t understand how some classrooms have white crayons along with various different shades of blues, reds, purples, pinks, greens, browns, and yellows. They even have gray and a bronzey one. But the one color a lot of kids ask me for they don’t have…black. They may have one in there. A tiny left over one that’s hard to find among all the others piled up on there.

I can understand telling the kids to not use black too much. Some kids, if you give them the black crayon, that’s all they want. They will color all over the page with it. Nothing wrong with that. Unless you’re encouraging them to use a variety, there’s nothing wrong.

If kids are being encouraged to use a variety of colors, then where is the black? I don’t understand this. You can’t just remove black out of the pile just because some kids will use that and only that all over there page. Kids need to be encouraged by giving choices. They need to be free to decide as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone else.

Maybe black stands out for some kids. How will the other colors stand out? How could you make them stand out without removing the innocent color you just made a culprit.

This is what I came up with for photo challenge on: Narrow My head formed the words Narrow Minded, which reminded me of this moment.